A look at the stats after 7 months 5


JULY 20, 2015

Today marks 7 months to the day that we drove out of the Keys to begin our Big Adventure! Eric and I can hardly believe it – the time has flown and it seems we’ve hardly blinked. We have been having a fantastic time and have taken to this lifestyle like Rubber Ducks to water. In spite of being together nearly 24/7 for all 214 days, we’ve had remarkably few grumpy moments and are just as excited about the prospect of the next 7 months! We are currently in Whittier, Alaska to say hi to some Keys friends who have a summer place here, and the office view today isn’t too bad! We are camping for free on a beach sandwiched between the Portage Glacier and Prince William Sound. In the understatement of the year, Eric said “this does not suck.”

Whittier view2 Whittier_view

In coming months we’re going to start adding expenses to give you a better idea of what it costs to live on the road, but in the meantime here’s a quick look at what we’ve been up to.

TOTAL DAYS ON THE ROAD: 214

TOTAL MILES DRIVEN: 9,254.31

NUMBER OF DISCREET CAMPING SITES: 63

NUMBER OF NIGHTS WITH NO POWER CONNECTION: 71 (33%)

NUMBER OF NIGHTS OF FREE CAMPING: 74 (35%)

TOTAL PAID FOR CAMPING: $3,510.97

  • Avg cost per night: $16.41
  • Avg “monthly rent”: $501.57
  • Cheapest paid site rate: $5.00/night
  • Most expensive paid site rate: $42.00/night

NATIONAL PARKS VISITED: 5

  • Gulf Islands National Seashore
  • Guadalupe Mountains National Park
  • Mesa Verde National Park
  • Denali National Park
  • Kenai Fjords National Park

There are a few more details in the map captions below if you’re still interested. More coming very soon on Alaska – I promise!

Phase 2.1. Since the 4-month stat update at Grayrocks Reservoir, WY we drove 731.6 miles (2,562.5 for this phase total) in 28 days and stayed at 4 different sites.

Phase 2.1. Since the 4-month stat update at Grayrocks Reservoir, WY we drove 731.6 miles (2,562.5 for this phase total) in 28 days and stayed at 4 different sites.

Phase 3: up through Canada! We drove 2098.2 miles in 17 days, staying in 12 different sites. The reason for the fast pace? Limited internet for work!

Phase 3: up through Canada! We drove 2098.2 miles in 17 days, staying in 12 different sites. The reason for the fast pace? Limited internet for work!

Phase 4: Alaska. So far we've driven 1703.4 miles in 35 days and have stayed in 13 different sites.

Phase 4: Alaska. So far we’ve driven 1703.4 miles in 35 days and have stayed in 13 different sites.


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5 thoughts on “A look at the stats after 7 months

  • Chris Solberg

    Nice update. Interesting stats. It’s very hard for me to believe that you have been “on the road” for 7 months. Wow!

  • Marie Parks

    Love the update! I think we started full-timing within a week of each other, so it is interesting to compare stats. Yours really proves the benefits of decent batteries, inverter and solar. We’ve spent a few thousand more than you guys (on private campground fees, I’m sure) because we only just got the ability to boondock a couple of months ago.

    • Eric

      We’re still trying to figure out the “value” of the solar. Thanks to charging from the engine, whenever we drive the RV our batteries are almost always full when we arrive somewhere, so even if we didn’t have the solar our first night is “free” power. Likewise, we’ll often leave with batteries a little more depleted than we might otherwise, because 3-4 hours of driving will put that back. It’s the in-between days where we would be running the generator an hour or two a day to keep the batteries up ( at about $5/ day for generator use ), and we’ve never really figured out how many of those there are.
      The other value that’s hard to quantify ( or at least we haven’t kept any records on it ) is that on several occasions, we’ve chosen either campgrounds or loops that don’t have power and cost us less than the powered sites. For instance, here in Seward, AK, the sites with power are another $5/night and we’ll be here for several nights, so that’s probably going to be a difference of $20, though it’ll be offset by about $5 in propane required to run the fridge and the water heater for a few days.
      Still, we look at the solar largely as a quality of life thing. It’s not only silent, it takes care of itself most of the time, charging the batteries until their full and keeping them topped off without any interaction from us, as long as it’s bright enough out to generate power. Keeping the batteries topped up will greatly extend their lifetime as well.
      We’re glad to be able to have you guys as dry camping neighbors!

    • Jet Post author

      Good to know! We have just started tracking mileage/fuel costs (groan) so that info will be coming in the next stat update. I’m not sure I want to know though!